Apple Hack Claim by Anonymous: No iPhone 5 or iPad 3 Impact

It seems that another high-profile hacking has taken place at the weekend and this time giant tech company Apple is the victim. It follows a recent stream of hacking incidents by Anonymous and LulzSec who are working together in their Antisec (Anti-Security) campaign. The Apple hack has been claimed by Anonymous and the group of hackers has posted a document to back this up.

Although Lulz Security is now disbanded some of its hackers worked with members of Anonymous on this latest hack, according to Ian Sherr over on The Wall Street Journal. It’s yet another notorious hacking among other recent hacks on government and corporate websites, including Sony, AT&T, the C.I.A and the U.S. Senate. The hacking group has posted a document on Twitter, which is alleged to contain 26 usernames and passwords for an Apple server along with a link to the server.

The hackers claim they exploited a security flaw in software that Apple and other companies use, to get into Apple’s systems. The tweet they posted (see above) referred to the fact that Apple could be a target and also suggested the group was also busy elsewhere. Over on SlashGear, Chris Davies tells how other information currently being accessed by Anonymous includes Australian election data and also dating website pepper.nl’s database.

This does not initially appear to be as serious a hacking as the Sony hack where 77 million users had their accounts compromised and so far it doesn’t seem as though any personal information has been leaked from the Apple data accessed by Anonymous. As Davies points out, Apple is well used to attention from hacking but up until now this has been concentrated on particular devices and iOS used on the iPhone, iPad and iPod touch. The company may well be surprised then that this time around company servers have been targeted and will no doubt be taking serious steps to beef up security for its systems.

Over on International Business Times an article refers to the release of the iPad 3 and iPhone 5 later this year and wonders if the hack may affect the launch dates of these devices. However that seems rather a jump too far at the moment and from what we already know we can’t see how this would affect the release of these products.

So far there has been no comment from Apple about the hack. What are your thoughts on the latest hacking incident by Anonymous and are you surprised that even the mighty Apple found itself vulnerable? Let us know with your comments.

  • Anonymous

    1. The Passwords were encrypted. That means they are kept encrypted on the server database. This makes them useless to anybody who obtained them. This is like, you stole a 500 page book but the pages are unsorted and no page number either.

    You can’t login into the server from the data published.2. It is unclear if the data is obtained from a server owned/managed by Apple. My understanding is that they are obtained from server managed by third parties hired by Apple to carry out online surveys.

    3. it is lame on the side of the hackers to publish some useless data from some useless places.