Android NFC Expected To Be Showcased By Google Tomorrow

Google are looking set to unveil their revolutionary NFC technology at a New York event tomorrow. This effectively turns your smartphone into a method of payment, simply scanning it in shops that accept NFC.

Near Field Communications is set to be introduced by a host of companies, with Android users that have Gingerbread in for a sweet treat. Readers are being installed in certain retailers including Subway, Macy’s and American Eagle, according to BBC News. Simply scan your smartphone on the reader and take your goods away in a jiffy, without so much as touching your wallet.

NFC technology will also be introduced by other manufacturers such as Apple, however not on the iPhone 5 it has been reported. More and more retailers are certain to introduce the technology into their stores, which could act as another incentive for customers to shop there just to use it. It looks as if NFC will be the future of purchase as it offers a huge amount of speed, simplicity and convenience, without pin codes and pockets full of loose change. This could finally be the extinction of mile long waiting lines!

Tech Radar has reported that Google are declining to comment about tomorrow’s event, they would not want to ruin a badly kept secret now, would they? It also looks certain that a number of NFC-enabled apps, which would assist Android owners in making payments, would be launched on the Android Market very soon. Is NFC the future of retail? We want to hear your feelings on the idea of paying for your future goods with your mobile phone, so feel free to leave a comment.

  • http://www.facebook.com/norreida Norreida Reyes

    Sounds great, happy to have shopping go in this direction, but change always has its challenges. Retailers will have to upgrade their shoplifting prevention practices, their receipt practices for returns, to name a few.

    From a social economic perspective, Americans already are incautious and spontaneous shoppers – won't this practice make it way too easy for people to "spend their lunch money in the candy machine"?