LinkedIn: Worth Almost $3 Billion – Your Thoughts?

We have reported on different stories from LinkedIn recently, we have mentioned that they have appointed a new board member and we have also provided some top tips to improve your profile. We have now found various reports saying that LinkedIn is now worth almost $3 billion.

LinkedIn: Worth Almost $3 Billion – Your Thoughts?

The shares in LinkedIn are currently selling for a minimum of $30 per share on secondary stock exchange; this brings the value of the ‘professional’ social network to just short of $3 billion. So how is the company valued at $2.91 billion when SharesPost values the company at $2.51 billion?

Douglas MacMillan and Ari Levy give a good explanation of how the value jumps up from $2.51 billion to $2.91 Bloomberg.com, so make sure you have a read. LinkedIn seems to be really growing, which is understandable when you think of all the functionality that you can make use of. One of the most valuable of them being the discussions as we explained in a previous article, we did also look at a couple of other aspects so read through the full article and make best use of LinkedIn.

Are you surprised by the valuation of LinkedIn? Do you think it will catch up with the other big social networking sites? Let us know your thoughts in the comments below.

  • http://www.facebook.com/richardameyer Richard Meyer

    If ANYONE believes that LinkedIn is worth $3 billion then I have some swamp land to sell you. LinkedIn often has problems and is down and on top of that is not a friendly user site. This to me is more indication that the Internet bubble continues to get bigger and when it bursts its going to be a big one

  • http://www.whoisbid.com whoisbid

    LinkedIn is something that head hunters are using to more aggressively target employees and continally offer them better deals. If you are a professional employed in a good job and happy about the long term prospects with your employer, its not a good idea to strip naked before the headhunters. This means that you publicly show that you value your own worth above that of the company which might give signals to employers that you are only interested in making a quick buck and short term prospects.