Diaspora: Preview and Walkthrough of the Facebook Alternative

Yesterday here at OSM, Tim reported on a new site Diaspora, and how it would be a stiff contender with the likes of networking sites such as Facebook and Twitter. The new site has been worked on and developed by four NYC University students with the hope that they would be able to give something that benefited its users in terms of privacy, something that Facebook has strongly been criticized for in the past.

Today we wanted to give you a little step into the new Diaspora and what features you can expect to see. Although only in the first initial stages of a private alpha, when logging in using Safari, it causes the browser to crash and it seems to be a constant issue. Investigating the site further, brings the question of when users will be able to send messages directly to their friends, and posting on their wall, something that we use and take for granted on Facebook. Being a new concept, the interface appears to be plain to the eye but clean looking. What Mashable has noted, is that a user’s data will be portable, selective and encrypted. Photos and data can be accessed easily and when closing your Diaspora‘s account this can be carried through without any complications.

Moving swiftly on, the biggest feature to talk about is “Aspects” which can be closely compared to that of Facebook’s “Groups.” Once you have sourced a group of friends, only then, can they comment and share your photos and messages. There are other benefits to aspects which can be looked at on Mashable. Another plus side to Diaspora is the ability to publish photos and messages and transfer them from there onto your Facebook or Twitter accounts.

The benefits to sorting out the privacy issues is a big selling point as well as you having the main control over what is shared out. But on the flipside to this, indications are showing that along with the blank interface, Safari’s crashing of the browser and subsequent problems with users trying to source out friends, Diaspora might have a little way to go before convincing us.

What do you think about this new contender? Do you think it stands a chance against the likes of Facebook and Twitter? Let us know. To find out more head on over to Mashable.