LinkedIn Tips: Using Social Etiquette

LinkedIn, the business-oriented social networking site which has been available online since 2003, has seen more than 75 million registered users in over 200 countries. As a user to this site, do you “accept” a friend request but do not taken it further. This leads to a build up of connections with people that you either do not realise are there or just exchange simple one word pleasantries.

According to Linda Coles at Social Media Examiner, there are steps that you can take to make your social etiquette more acceptable. Where possible send personalized connection requests via your LinkedIn account, these will more often than not be directed towards professionals within your field.

By clicking your Add to Network link, you can send a contact invitation to a specific person’s profile page. By making your message more personalized, you can become more of a face then just a name on the screen. By making the invitation more one to one your contact should hopefully reply with a short message. Linda then comments that she likes to take a look at her new found connections profile, to find something that she may be able to relate to and then take the conversation a step further.

After the one to one contacts Linda also gives suggestions on how to open an email to a group of connections. She starts by saying “Greetings to you all” and then immediately adds “Please excuse my lack of personalization in this email, as I am sending this out to a group of connections.” Her advice is to sell yourself or your company in the best possible way highlighting all the good things.

By following Linda’s tips, you can gain valuable recommendations to your LinkedIn profile which can only assist in making your company stand out above the rest. To read more on how you can personalize your LinkedIn connections, head on over to Social Media Examiner. What are your thoughts on this?

  • http://www.deferolaw.com Mark at Defero

    The problem with LinkedIn is that there is almost zero engagement on it. It serves more as a contacts book, much like Outlook or gmail than Facebook or Twitter. I was having this conversation last night with an ex-colleague who started off using LinkedIn to try and develop his own business but soon realised that he was simply connected to the same people that he had in his current address book. It's sheer size, we agreed, was starting to weigh against it. Niche communities are the way forward.