Print newspapers fading but news as commodity thriving

A few weeks ago we published an article about social media marketing and newspaper advertising where we pointed out how increasingly people are getting their news from online resources rather than physical newspapers. Now it seems this idea that traditional newspapers are fading has been backed-up by The New York Times’ publisher and chairman, Arthur Sulzberger Jr., who recently stated that eventually the paper in its physical form will cease to exist.

At the International Newsroom Summit, Sulzberger said, “We will stop printing the New York Times sometime in the future, date TBD,” according to an article by Jolie O’Dell over on Mashable. Some may be shocked at the idea that newspapers in their present form may stop being printed but others realize it’s really an inevitable conclusion because of the way more and more people are gathering their news. It’s not that people are uninterested in news as it’s still a thriving commodity, it’s just the way that people are obtaining it that’s changing.

Newspaper circulation and therefore revenue continues to drop and year-over-year between 2008 and 2009 27.2% of ad revenue was lost. Indeed a recent poll over on Mashable showed that only 21.7% of its readers now get their news from a traditional newspaper. Of course it’s worth remembering that the average Mashable user is probably younger than the average newspaper reader and more technologically-minded, but even so that’s a staggering figure.

More and more newspapers are having to face the fact that they have to change with the times (excuse the pun), and get into web-friendly ways of marketing their product. It certainly looks likely then that we will see more and more of the big media organizations finding ways to earn revenue from online customers. For more on this go to mashable.com. Would you miss not having a newspaper in a physical form or maybe it’s a long time since you purchased a print newspaper? We’d be interested to hear your comments about this so feel free to send them in.