Twitter and Google Maps: Bupa tracks mood of UK tweeters

FORGET the stereotypical British reserve, pioneering new research shows we’re a nation of Tweeting romantics. A unique analysis by Bupa of more than 66,000 Twitter posts reveals the prevalent mood of the nation’s Tweeters is ‘in love’, with 31,353 posts in the past four weeks alone (47 per cent).

And British Tweeters are a chirpy lot, with ‘happy’ the second most popular mood for 21 per cent followed closely by ‘excited’ (15 per cent). Britain is definitely not a doom and gloom nation with only six per cent of Tweeters feeling ‘sad’.

To gauge the mood of the Tweeting nation, healthcare experts Bupa analysed over 66,000 real time Tweets. Launching today, this Mood Mapper breaks down Tweets by location and maps them using Google Maps, producing an instantly up-to-date ‘mood map’.

Bupa Health and Wellbeing medical director, Dr. Katrina Herren, said: “We are interested in understanding how the nation’s Tweeters are feeling and so we’ve launched the Twitter Mood Mapper, providing us with a revolutionary glimpse into the Tweeting population. Anyone can use it even if they are not on Twitter – simply visit www.howareyoubritain.co.uk.”

Virtual versus Reality – Social networking is having an impact on how we communicate about our health and wellbeing, with one in five (20 per cent*) Brits more likely to be honest about how they’re feeling when someone asks ‘How are you?’ online, via email or through social networking.

Equally, over three-quarters (78 per cent) of Brits think we’re more open about our health and wellbeing than 20 years ago, with the figure rising to 83 per cent among women.

The findings, taken from the second chapter of the Bupa ‘How are you Britain?’ report, also show one in 10 (10 per cent) Brits who are currently signed up to a social networking site, post an online comment about how they’re feeling at least once a day, rising to 32 per cent at least once a week.

Old habits die hard – Although we may be more open about our health than ever before, we still revert to type when it comes to responding to that age-old question ‘how are you?’ face-to-face.

On average, people are asked ‘how are you?’ four times a day, however more than half (53 per cent) answer with a similar answer each time without really considering the question and close to a third (31 per cent) give a vague answer because they think people only ask to be polite.

Bupa Health and Wellbeing medical director, Dr. Katrina Herren, said: “We believe ‘How are you?’ should not be a rhetorical question. It’s an important conversation starter and people needn’t be afraid of responding with how they really feel. Sharing an emotion with people who listen and don’t judge it to be good or bad can not only make you feel better, but improve communication between you and others and maintain your mental wellbeing.”

To view the map and update how you feel in real-time visit howareyoubritain.co.uk | Article thanks to Brando Social